Military History Carnival

Military History Carnival 8 is up here.

Commonwealth War Graves Commission post 1945

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission have added a new feature to their database. It is now possible to search on for the details of graves after 1945. 

You can click here to fid out more.  

 

YouTube and the war in Iraq

*Cross posted here*

Michael Yon is an American author currently based in Iraq.

You can read more about him here and here.

He represents an important voice in the Iraq conflict. Though an ex-special forces soldier, his work offers a unique viewpoint on the war. He reports are almost always pro-military, though in traditional style, not always pro-authority.

This morning, whist reading this post, I realised that Yon’s work is in many ways, grounding breaking.

His latest post is simple. It praises an American officer, pointing out that:

‘Leaders such as Rakene Lee, LTC Doug Crissman, LTC Fred Johnson, LTC Erik Kurilla and Colonel Townsend —all of whom have a very strong grasp on how to win this war—are increasingly easy to find because the Army and Marines have morphed to meet this war.’

This is standard stuff. Yet, what sets it aside was this link, tucked away at the end of the post. It takes you straight to YouTube and a video taken by Yon (I assume) of the Marine he was writing about in operations. It shows him orchestrating the clearing of a tunnel. The pragmatic bravery is almost palpable. But this isn’t my point. The video represents something new in war reporting. The use of democratic Internet tools, such as Youtube, gives the viewer a direct, unedited, uncensored feedback on just what’s happing in Iraq. It is a day-to-day portrayal of a soldier’s war. Sure, Yon has his own agenda. However, the ease at which this material can be accessed by the general public, gives Yon, and anyone else with an ‘agenda’, a platform.

 

Ibiblio

*Cross posted at http://garysmailes.typepad.com*

I am currently up to my eyes researching for Terry Deary’s latest Horrible History book. The focus is spies during WW2. I am lucky this time around in that we have some extra help from experts on operations in France. This leaves me just every other country involved in the war!

When researching I am always looking for free and accurate resources. You never know what a project is going to throw up and though I am always on the look out for cheap, second hand books, you can’t cover all bases.The library is obviously a great place, but if I can get the information through a digital resource then it saves time and money.

One site that is sometimes of great help is ibiblio. They have a huge collection of free ebooks, but mostly importantly they have loads of history stuff. So enjoy.

Oh yeah, when you get bored check out Project Gutenberg.

Thomas Arthur VC

I found this at the UK National Inventory of War Memorials blog:

A new memorial to VC winners has been unveiled in Glasgow at the city’s Necropolis.  The unveiling co-incides with the 150th anniversary of the Victoria Cross and was preceded by a memorial service in Glasgow Cathedral.

Read more from BBC NEWS

We have currently recorded 606 memorials that commemorate VC or GC winners.

Browse the list of memorials to VC and GC winners.

Among these is a memorial to Thomas Arthur V.C.  Arthur was one of the first men to be awarded the Victoria Cross at the first Investiture ceremony held by Queen Victoria on 26 June 1857.

Here’s the wiki link to Thomas Arthur.

Thomas Arthur VC

I found this at the UK National Inventory of War Memorials blog:

A new memorial to VC winners has been unveiled in Glasgow at the city’s Necropolis.  The unveiling co-incides with the 150th anniversary of the Victoria Cross and was preceded by a memorial service in Glasgow Cathedral.

Read more from BBC NEWS

We have currently recorded 606 memorials that commemorate VC or GC winners.

Browse the list of memorials to VC and GC winners.

Among these is a memorial to Thomas Arthur V.C.  Arthur was one of the first men to be awarded the Victoria Cross at the first Investiture ceremony held by Queen Victoria on 26 June 1857.

Here’s the wiki link to Thomas Arthur.

New Blog

I have had a bit of a break from blogging over the last couple of weeks. This has given me time to think. When I started this blog I wanted it to be a home for my Victoria Cross research. However, due to the nature of life this research is sporadic. As a result I started to use the blog for my general thoughts. Anyway, I have now decided to start a new blog which is much more general and allows me to talk about my writing.

You can check it out here.

If will continue to update this blog as and when.

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