Military History Carnival

Military History Carnival 8 is up here.

Thomas Arthur VC

I found this at the UK National Inventory of War Memorials blog:

A new memorial to VC winners has been unveiled in Glasgow at the city’s Necropolis.  The unveiling co-incides with the 150th anniversary of the Victoria Cross and was preceded by a memorial service in Glasgow Cathedral.

Read more from BBC NEWS

We have currently recorded 606 memorials that commemorate VC or GC winners.

Browse the list of memorials to VC and GC winners.

Among these is a memorial to Thomas Arthur V.C.  Arthur was one of the first men to be awarded the Victoria Cross at the first Investiture ceremony held by Queen Victoria on 26 June 1857.

Here’s the wiki link to Thomas Arthur.

Thomas Arthur VC

I found this at the UK National Inventory of War Memorials blog:

A new memorial to VC winners has been unveiled in Glasgow at the city’s Necropolis.  The unveiling co-incides with the 150th anniversary of the Victoria Cross and was preceded by a memorial service in Glasgow Cathedral.

Read more from BBC NEWS

We have currently recorded 606 memorials that commemorate VC or GC winners.

Browse the list of memorials to VC and GC winners.

Among these is a memorial to Thomas Arthur V.C.  Arthur was one of the first men to be awarded the Victoria Cross at the first Investiture ceremony held by Queen Victoria on 26 June 1857.

Here’s the wiki link to Thomas Arthur.

New Blog

I have had a bit of a break from blogging over the last couple of weeks. This has given me time to think. When I started this blog I wanted it to be a home for my Victoria Cross research. However, due to the nature of life this research is sporadic. As a result I started to use the blog for my general thoughts. Anyway, I have now decided to start a new blog which is much more general and allows me to talk about my writing.

You can check it out here.

If will continue to update this blog as and when.

The Falklands War in perspective

Ross Mahoney has posted an excellent review/summary of the recent seminar at the Centre for First World War Studies in Birmingham. It was titled ‘The Falklands War in Perspective: 25 Years On.’

Here’s his opening paragraph:

‘Saturday 23rd June saw another day school at the Centre for First World War Studies, University of Birmingham. The theme for this year’s school centred on the Falklands War in respect of that conflicts 25th anniversary, which was commemorated this year. Being the first day school I have attended I was pleasantly surprised with a good turn out at the event even though Dr John Bourne, the Centre’s director, did note it was not as high as usual and that this was probably because the content was not about the First World War though after listening to Dr Bob Bushaway’s lecture you could have been forgiven for thinking that you were but more on that later.’

Other stuff worth a look

Roman Times talking about Brennus and the First Sack of Rome.

Mark Grimsley’s second installment of his discussion about military history in general history courses.

Cardinal Wolsey’s Today in History talking about how Cornish rebels meet a sticky end , 27th June, 1497.

imageNews for Medievalists reveals plans for Board game Carcassonne becoming a video game.

 

 

 

Military History in history courses

Mark Grimsely at Blog Them Out of the Stone Age has began a series of posts, responding to a challenge of ‘incorporating military history into general US history courses.’ As you would expect of anything posted by Mark, the opening thrust of the debate is stimulating and contains some great links to additional material.

To me it raises another question – ‘Why is military history not already included in general US history courses?’

In the UK military history has become an integral part of the GCSE teaching program. Students are taught in depth about both the first and second world wars, events such as the battle of Britain, Dunkirk, trench life and the battle of the Somme are all examined in detail. I am not sure how much of this is carried through to university level, though I suspect it is far more prominent in the UK than the US.

Other stuff worth a look

Sparta talks about The Spartan Hoplites’ Uniform.

Collaborative Manuscript Transcription has an interview with Mat Unger of Papa’s Diary.

A list of new medieval warfare articles at De Re Militari Website.

The Medieval Warfare Blog looks at computer games with a medieval topic.

War correspondent, Michael Yon, reports from Iraq about the first day of Arrowhead Ripper.

 

Papas Diary Project

Many times on this blog I have ranted on about my belief that the Internet will (has) transform the way in which historical information is viewed and exchanged. Since the introduction of free blogging services and relatively cheap hardware, DIY digitalization has become a real option.

Papa’s Diary Project is a great example of what can be done. Matt Unger is currently transcribing and blog posting a daily page from his grandfather, Harry Scherman’s 19 24 diary. At the time Harry Scheurman was twenty-nine years old. He had been in America for 11 years, but much of his family still lived in the central European, Jewish ghetto of his youth. He was a garment worker, union activist and Zionist fundraiser. He was also unmarried and terribly lonely.

The blog makes fascinating reading and, for me, represents one of the many facets of the Internet that I find so exciting.

Ben Brumfield at Collaborative Manuscript Transcription has also posted about Matt’s blog.

Other stuff worth a look

Sparta
The Greek Fire and Ancient Chemical Warfare & The Pilos Helmet and the spartan Hoplites.

Campus Mawrtius
digitalized version of a 10th century manuscript of the Iliad.

Blog Them Out of the Stone Age
Mark Grimsley resurrecting the old discussion about Academics v Intellectuals.

The 48th Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteer Infantry
Lt. Curtis Pollock Describes the Battle of Fredericksburg